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Big Rideshare

Big Rideshare refers to the companies that presently appear to own the ridesharing market.

Uber clearly indicates in their SEC filings (page 37) that they intend to increase their withholdings from drivers' fares, and that they simply do not care about driver dissatisfaction and that they remain focused upon replacing drivers with autonomous vehicles.

Lyft's articles indicate the opposite, that they intend to be known as the company that treats its drivers exceptionally well, yet all of us who have driven for them know that they abuse drivers even worse than Uber does. After being cited as the exceptional service provider by Newsweek, they have become much worse than Uber, denying drivers phone support access (which Uber does not), and withholding up to 80% of earnings from passengers' fares, which is way more than Uber has ever been known to withhold! It is obvious that Lyft is preying upon its community while riding on its "best-in-class" reputation.

Are we to wonder therefore why all of the rideshare-driver demonstrations across the country were ignored by both Uber and Lyft?

Rideshare Cooperative

In contrast to Big Rideshare, Rideshare Cooperative is focused on ensuring that drivers receive the maximum amount of their fares. Operating as a cooperative, member drivers will receive exclusive benefits, and their earnings will never be withheld by greedy executives and shareholders. Although every vetted driver can drive with us, only those who are members will instantly retain 90% of their passengers' fares, and only members will receive membership benefits.

Moreover President Donald Trump's revised tax plan, which does not allow contractors to expense mileage and other deductions, allows our drivers to expense all of their deductions because they are self-employed.

How much will a typical driver earn?

These projected earnings are based upon member drivers serving member passengers for 60 minutes. (All passengers may be members, and non-member passengers will pay higher fares than those represented herein.) Bear in mind that these earnings do not reflect drivers' operating expenses and taxes.

Want to see the math? Here's an example. In the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) demand is most intense during rush hour when ride fees are expected to be reduced to $0.80 per minute in slow-moving traffic. In a typical 60-minute rush-hour ride, where forty-five minutes are in slow-moving traffic (@ $0.80 per minute), and fifteen minutes are in free-flowing traffic (@ $0.95 per minute), the passenger will be charged (45 * $0.80) + (15 * $0.95), which is the same as ($36) + ($14.25), which adds up to $50.25. In turn, the member-driver will receive 90% of the fare: $45.22.

In cities where cost of living is much lower, like Las Vegas (LV), passengers may expect to pay $0.75 per minute in free-flowing traffic, and $0.60 per minute in heavy traffic. In a similar ride in LV, where forty-five minutes are in slow-moving traffic (@ $0.60 per minute), and fifteen minutes are in free-flowing traffic (@ $0.75 per minute), the passenger will be charged (45 * $0.60) + (15 * $0.75), which is the same as ($27) + ($11.25), which adds up to $38.25. In turn, the member-driver will receive 90% of the fare: $34.43.

Bear in mind that if demand is unusually high then a hurrying passenger may apply a surcharge to expedite a driver's arrival.

Naturally bridge and road tolls, state, municipal and institutional fees, and credit card processing fees will be charged to passengers in addition to the fare. Tolls will be passed on to drivers in full, state and municipal fees will be passed on to their respective recipients, and credit card fees will be forwarded to the credit card processors.

Rideshare Cooperative Driver Membership

Driver membership is free, and we recommend signing up immediately to secure a spot, as many will need to await vetting and might also remain in waiting if too many drivers already exist in their region.

Vetted drivers will be added in the order in which they sign up, and spaces might be limited in some regions.

Join our membership now - click here.

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